Young, female native speaker of English (including Dutch) needed in Indonesia

Here’s a classic FOB (fresh off the boat) fresh out of the Jakarta Post (19 Aug 2011): “If you are a young, female native speaker English teacher. Please send your CV with photograph to: 0217206108 or email to ele127@cbn.net.id or 127ele@gmail.com.

Here’s the website:

http://www.englishlanguageforexecutives.com/index.html

Sounds dodgy, but this Jakarta-based in-house training outfit gets some good contracts. Plus, you’ll be introduced to both the exploit-the-foreigner and ESL-as-entertainment approaches to Indonesia’s workplace English market.

I can pretty much guess what the job entails: getting up very early to stand in front of a class of sleepy, slightly under-motivated middle-aged bureaucrats, 90% men.  But you’ll be safe and you’ll learn a lot about language training and Indonesia.

Location? Ask ELE for a map indicating the exact location where you’ll be teaching before you accept any offer. Taxi fare adds up faster than it used to in Jakarta, especially in rush hour. 

How much will I make? Just as little as the grandmotherly figure running the operation can get away with paying you.

What are the risks? Switch and bait. They’ll offer you visa, all the hours you want, driver etc. But what you’ll get is the class of bureaucrats every morning. So just roll with it. It gets you into the market. Be professional and bargain hard. Expect phone calls at odd hours when you’re sharpest, but don’t pick up.

Are there any benefits?  Not per se. However, as long as the guys in the class don’t complain they don’t really care what you do in there.  In fact, as long as you’re a young, female and you *look* like a native speaker and speak good English, you may find that they give you all the classes you can handle. There won’t be a lot of formalities either, unless you specifically negotiate them. So you can go to work immediately.

 

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About Sharehouse Jakarta

We publish a blog about expat life in the Dutch colonial district of Jakarta, Indonesia, the world's 4th largest and most laid back country.
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